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Bobby Tassone: What it’s like to be a Minor League Baseball Umpire

Bobby Tassone: What it’s like to be a Minor League Baseball Umpire

Carolina League umpire Bobby Tassone visits with us to share his story about making The Decision to pursue umpiring as a career and his subsequent trip through umpire school and the Minor Leagues. We discuss what life is like for him as a Minor League Baseball umpire, some special game opportunities he’s had, and learn about his experiences at Spring Training. You’re really going to enjoy listening to Bobby—he has a real heart for teaching and is a humble guy who repeatedly points to the mentors that have helped him along the way.  

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Jason:

I am lucky to visit with Bobby Tassone, a Minor League umpire who will be working in the Carolina League this year. I am so excited for you to hear from him. He’s a pretty mellow guy, but do not let his low-key demeanor fool you. Bobby has a very true, very deep passion for what he’s doing as an umpire, working his way through and up the Minor League system.

We discuss his decision to pursue umpiring as a career, his journey so far through the minor leagues, the opportunities he’s had, and the good folks who have helped him along the way. We talk about life in Spring Training and a whole lot more.

Please enjoy my visit with Bobby Tassone.

Jason:

Bobby, welcome. Thanks for coming on the show!

Bobby:

Thanks for having me!

Jason:

It’s awesome to have you, man! I met you a few weeks ago. You and I worked a doubleheader together, which I want to get to later on, and we were able to have the traditional “chat in the parking lot” before and after. You were actually one of the very first people to learn about Umpire Inspire, so this is a pleasure to have you and I’ve been looking forward to it. I know that we have some interesting stuff to talk about today.

So to start out, before we get back to the beginnings of your career, where are you at now and what are you doing? Give me two to three minutes on what your current situation is and what you’ve got going on for the next several weeks.

Bobby:

Right now I’m out in Phoenix, Arizona a couple of weeks early for spring training. I report here on March 15—Cincinnati Reds camp for the second year in a row. So I’ll be out here until about April 3 or so. Just working, getting back in the swing of things, hanging out with all of all the guys out here and getting ready to go for when I head out to the Carolina League for Opening Day on April 9.

Jason:

Right on. Congratulations. Is the Carolina League a repeat for you? Is it a move up? Is it a different situation for you than last year?

Bobby:

Yeah, the Carolina League is a promotion. The Carolina League is one of the three High A classification leagues, so that’s one step below AA. Last year I was in the Midwest League, which is the lower classification. Both are full season, 140 games each. So this year is a promotion going up to the next level. One step closer.

Jason:

That’s awesome. Congrats, man. What helped you to earn your promotion? Can you tell me a little bit about the evaluations you get and what you need to do to earn that step?

Bobby:

Sometimes there’s a little bit of luck involved. We get evaluated eight games of our 140. So sometimes you got to have a little bit of luck involved. You’re doing the same thing over and over every night and just trying to be as consistent as possible so once you get to those nights that may be a little more stressful than others, when you have a supervisor evaluating you, you’re just kind of doing the same thing you would have done regardless of whether or not they were there. So, I’ve approached games the same way like that every time and it’s paid off so far for me.

Jason:

How do you find out that you’re going to be moving up, or elsewhere, or lateral? What’s the process like? Is it a postseason meeting that you have? Is it an email, a phone call? How does that work, and when did you find out that you’d be going up to the Carolina League this year?

Bobby:

Right around the middle of October, we’ll get a post-season evaluation form, which puts together all of our evaluations we had throughout the season. It also includes our ranking. I actually found out about my promotion the weekend before Thanksgiving when I was out in San Antonio at an umpire clinic that I was helping out with out there.

Jason:

Right on. And it’s a mix of plate and base evaluations that you get… is it half and half, or is it just what it is?

Bobby:

Correct. Yeah, it’s all culminating. They take into account your plate work, your base work, and kind of push it all together and then I get evaluated amongst my peers.

Jason:

Can you remember some of the comments that were made that helped them to choose you for promotion? What were the specific things that you did well last year that helped you along this year?

Bobby:

My mobility definitely got better last year. I’ll be 30 here in about two weeks, so staying in the gym definitely helps maintain your physical capabilities to keep up with some of these kids that are 17, 18, 19 years old coming through the minor leagues now. That was one thing that stood out for me, which was nice because I put in a lot of work in the gym last year.

Jason:

You worked hard on it and it was recognized. That’s good.

Well, Bobby, let’s take it back. You’ve been doing this for a lot of years, working your way up. Can you tell me where it all started for you? And specifically, I’m curious to hear about your decision when you decided to go for it, to lay it all out there and make the decision to pursue umpiring as a career. What was that like for you and what was that like for the others in your life, family and friends?

Bobby:

My parents moved us all out to Illinois in 2001. There were six of us, and conveniently like an acre walk out of the backyard we had some ball diamonds. So I mean, as a kid growing up, loving baseball, it’s like they’re showing us the house and we’re like, “uh, yeah, we need to buy this house, mom. Yup, yup, yup. This is where I want to be.” So I started out umpiring back there and it was just a dream summer job for a kid who loved baseball and couldn’t get enough of it. If I didn’t go out and play that night, I would end up going out and umpiring, starting with doing seven and eight year old level games right behind my house. During the daytime I would also go out there and prepare the fields, chalk them, drag them, get them ready to be played on. So it was kind of a little sense of pride—since I’m going to be working on this field tonight, I’m going to give this one a little more attention. I had kind of a gold mine as a young young person back there. I did it through college—I could always count on probably 120 games scheduled for the summer. But being in the Midwest, you know, you’re lucky if you got 80 of those.

Jason:

All the rain. Sounds like the Northwest.

Bobby:

Yeah, exactly. So really, the journey until I moved to Phoenix, Arizona in 2014 was just something I just did as a summer job. When I moved to Phoenix I took a teaching job for two years. I was a seventh and eighth grade social studies teacher in central Phoenix, however, I had to supplement my income as a teacher with baseball umpiring. And it was great. It was to the point where I had to say no—there’s just so much baseball out here. I really got around a lot of good people out here and had an enormous amount of reps. When I got to Phoenix, I didn’t know half the things I thought I did about baseball umpiring at that point. I was already almost ten years into doing this, and then I got out here and it was a whole new world.

So after doing teaching for two years, I get around a lot of seasoned veterans out here and over time I just kept hearing the same repetitive response, with these guys saying “I wish I would have went to umpire school to see how this would have gone, I maybe could have had a chance to make it to the Major Leagues.” And after hearing that over and over, I just didn’t want to become the same. I didn’t want to have to say to myself later on in life, you know, “I wish I would have.” So after my second year of teaching, I put my resignation in. I worked baseball primarily in Phoenix and worked 528 games at the amateur level out here that year. You can definitely do that out here. There’s guys that go over 600 games a year. It’s absolutely crazy, but you can do it. So at that point I just took the leap, started preparing as much as I could and went to umpire school. It was definitely scary to basically quit a career that had all the job security that you would need, like insurance and whatnot, and just decide I’m going to chase this out and see what happens. So it was kind of funny—after I graduated in 2013 from college, I struggled for about a year and a half to find a teaching job. And right after I graduated from college, I remember my dad saying, “you ever thought about going to umpire school?” And I didn’t go until 2017.

Jason:

So listen to your parents, kids—sometimes we know! It’s infrequent, but it is true sometimes.

Bobby:

Right. So when I made the decision finally, it was like, what took you so long? Kind of a funny moment in my family.

Jason:

That’s great man. They were happy to hear that too, right?

Bobby:

Yeah, absolutely. So from there, I went to Daytona Beach, attended Harry Wendelstedt’s Umpire School and the rest is history to this point.

Jason:

Umpire schools like Wendelstedt offer a very limited number of jobs, right?

Bobby:

Yeah, definitely. And it varies year to year. It depends on how many retirements you have from the Major League level and on down, trickling all the way down to the Rookie level of classification. Some years it could be 40 jobs available. The year I went, I think there was 23. So it really varies. It definitely varies a lot.

Jason:

How many students were in that class with you?

Bobby:

I want to say there were about 225 attendees between the two schools.

Jason:

And you got one of just a couple dozen spots that year?

Bobby:

Yeah.

Jason:

Can you remember what your thought process was when you did get that call and realized, okay, this is happening?

Bobby:

Yeah. It’s a great sense of achievement. But at the same time, you make friends for five weeks out there and have to remain humble in a sense, to not be overexcited for yourself, just to be respectful to your peers that you were attending school with as well. But yeah, it was definitely a sense of relief because you go out there kind of putting $4,000 on red or black in a sense—it’s not a guaranteed thing. It’s a really big gamble—and you’re not working for five weeks either. So it’s tough for guys or girls to go out there and attend the professional training. I wish everybody could do it, but it’s just not financially feasible for most. It’s definitely an experience.

Jason:

Do you remember who your first call was after you got the news that you had been selected?

Bobby:

Oh, I definitely called my parents. They’re my biggest supporters. And then I called my great aunt who helped me out financially to actually attend umpire school. It was a really cool experience last year in the Midwest League when I got to work in her hometown of Peoria, Illinois, where the St. Louis Cardinals have their affiliate team in the Midwest League. It was really an awesome experience for both of us—she helped me get there and I put the work in to get there. Having her there that night in the stands, just watching a baseball game with her great nephew, that was a great experience.

Jason:

I love that. That’s cinematic right there.

Bobby:

Yeah, absolutely.

Jason:

We’re all standing on the shoulders of so many people that have helped us along.

Bobby:

Definitely.

Jason:

Back in your social studies teaching days, getting involved with baseball down in Arizona, you said that you ran into some real good people, some veterans that helped you along and encouraged you and told you, “I wish I would have rolled the dice. I wish I would have put four grand down on black.”  Do you remember some of those first mentors that spurred you along?

Bobby:

Definitely. One mentor I had was a unique case and one of my great friends, Angel Campos, who actually worked all the way up as a callup umpire at the Major League level. Angel had over 500 games at the big league level, but he took me under his wing the year before I went to umpire school and really gave me all the details. Everything I needed to know, he helped me out. That was such a huge benefit to be able to work with a resource like that. I do definitely thank him a lot for my success because I learned so much even prior to going to umpire school. I felt like I had a quarter-step ahead of everyone just because I had that knowledge I gained from him.

Jason:

How did you run into Angel Campos? Was he umpiring down there at that time? Was he evaluating for an association? What was that all about?

Bobby:

Angel works at the Division One college level now. But during the summertime, we have UICs or umpires that are there just to make sure everything’s going smoothly. Especially in the hot months here in Phoenix, just to have an extra person out there in case somebody goes down so we don’t have to scramble to find a fill in is necessary. So he was working as a UIC one day and got wind that I was going to commit to umpire school and that I already had. So he really did take it upon himself just to help groom me as much as he possibly could prior to my going. I can’t thank him enough for that. There were several other guys out here, too, when I first moved here that led me in the right direction. Ken Gonzales is another other guy that I definitely looked up to. Ken definitely taught me a thing or two about situation management and what to do and what not to do at times. He’s been one of my great friends as well with just developing out here as an umpire.

Jason:

With those guys and others that have kind of spoken into your life and helped you along the way. Is it more mechanics or is it more game management type stuff that you feel is most beneficial when you’re talking to mentors and more seasoned umpires like that?

Bobby:

No, it’s definitely game management. The mechanics will come, we all change them here and there. We play with what we feel works for us, but it’s more how to handle all those nitty-gritty times, how to overcome situations, especially when we do have failures on the field.

Jason:

That was clearly a leading question because I think that’s been true in my life in regards to mechanics and the rules. You can work on those things, and step-by-step they improve. But game management, it only comes by being there, by doing it. And to have somebody like that in your corner speaking to you and filling up your tank with that intel and that encouragement, that’s super priceless.

Well, let’s dive into where you’re at right now and into the next few weeks of spring training for you. Can you tell me the details of where you’re at, who you work for, who you work with, your crew, and what role you play on that crew? And I’m also really curious to hear if there are any very specific things that you are working on in your game this year, either that you’ve been instructed to work on or personal things that you have inside you that you really want to pay attention to during these next few weeks of spring training.

Bobby:

I’m going to be at the Cincinnati Reds camp again in Arizona for the second year in a row. We have most of the returning guys, although our chief actually got pulled to work the World Baseball Classic qualifier—which is awesome for him to go and be a part of that. So that slid in another person and there’s five of us at our camp. And this year I will be actually the number two guy on our five man crew at the Cincinnati Reds side.

Jason:

What does that mean?

Bobby:

So the number two, that’s just one step below the crew chief. I’m really looking forward to the challenges, the, the responsibilities and taking that on this year. Last year I shared “low man” duties with one of my friends, Dylan Bradley, so making that jump between being one of the low guys and going to two man, I’m excited for the challenge and I’m ready for it. You’re just helping out as much as you can for the crew chief, keeping everything going smoothly and making sure there’s no problems through the three weeks that we’re out here for Minor League spring training.

Minor League Baseball is who hires us individually for this assignment, and then we just get placed at one of our two preferences for our spring camps. I put in for the Reds this year and the Padres. The few things you look for is location—the Padres, I think they have some of the best cafeteria food throughout the spring training sites. But the Reds have a really good barbecue company that always caters for us. So the food’s usually really good. So it still is the little comforts of home that you always try to look for on the road.

Jason:

And what’s the day by day like—do you work front field games, back field games, a mixture of both? Are you working one, two games a day?

Bobby:

That’s a good question. We work back field games and it’s usually just one game a day at about 10am or 11am, and then after that you have the rest of the afternoon to go out and maybe get a nap in, get a gym session in. And then you’re just preparing for the next day. We’ll do a rules study amongst our crew and depending on who wants to meet up, we’ll go out with one of the other 14 crews that are out here and kinda just catch up with all your friends and meet new people. The big league umpires are out here too, and they come out and say hello. And it’s always great to talk to them and just get to know them as people.

Jason:

I’m interested to hear about the MLB guys being around. What’s the environment like? What’s the atmosphere when you’re off the field, is it pretty chill? Is it pretty laid-back or are guys more or less focused on the task and what needs to be done?

Bobby:

Yes, it’s pretty laid-back. We’re all here to work and ultimately get back in the swing of things, but spring training is a good time to reconnect with your friends. We all live all over the country and you get to just talk shop with your fellow umpire at times. And in the big league guys out here, it’s just great to have guys that are at that level who are willing to maybe give you a piece of information, a tip, what have you. It’s really an interesting and unique experience during spring training for sure.

Jason:

Do you find that most of those MLB guys are pretty willing to chat with a guy like you who’s working his way up and answer questions and help you along?

Bobby:

Oh yeah, those guys are all great people.

Jason:

So what about your on-field stuff this year? Are there a couple of things specifically that you can think of that you’re working on this year to get yourself ready for the season?

Bobby:

In Single-A we work two-man, so this year I’m really going to be focusing on how I can refine positioning for plays, paying attention to routes I’m taking since we’ve got very little variance in the two-man system for error since we’re just covering such a big ground. So it’s really just mentally breaking down plays before they happen so I’m in a good position to see a play and not trying to do too much on the field. I’m pretty low key on the field as I’m sure as you remember a couple weeks ago.

Jason:

And I loved it.

So Bobby, you’ve had the opportunity to work a couple big games in the last couple of years. I know that you’ve taken part in a couple of championship series and some other special games. Can you tell me about some of the bigger opportunities you’ve had these past couple of years as you’ve been working your way up?

Bobby:

Yeah, definitely. I’ve had the honor to work the playoffs the last three years in the Arizona League, the Pioneer League, and last year in the Midwest League. I worked the plate in the Northwest League vs. Pioneer League All-Star Game in Grand Junction, Colorado. That was definitely an honor to have that assignment. Then I also worked throughout both rounds of the playoffs and the Pioneer League Championship.This last year it was really a fun experience working in the Midwest League since I’m so close to home in that league. Being able to work at places where I used to go to games as a kid and just having that feeling like, “I remember this place, but now it’s different.” And yes, just being selected is always an honor. Obviously that means generally good things are ahead for the next year for you. You get a playoff assignment. So I’m just trying to maintain, trying to just keep my game the way it is right now and hope for the best.

Jason:

Was some of your family able to come out to the Midwest championship series?

Bobby:

They were not able to, however, I had family and friends in 11 of the 16 cities in that league. Throughout the whole season in almost every city I was going to I was running into somebody I knew, which made the summer fly by pretty quickly, a lot faster than I wanted it to go. But it was definitely an awesome experience.

Jason:

Nice to see a friendly face in the stands or after the game, right?

Bobby:

Definitely. Especially when you’re on the road and spending almost 200 nights a year in hotel rooms. Anytime you see somebody, it always brings the life back into you a little bit, especially in those later months. In July and August, we’re kind of getting ready for home.

Jason:

Refills that empty tank that’s running on fumes. Definitely. What about that plate job for the Pioneer League championship game? Did that game go well for you?

Bobby:

That game went really well. It was a long game—I think it ended up being 14–12 or something like that with the Pioneer League winning. But my goodness, the Northwest league brought three or four guys that were throwing over 103 a piece. One guy hit 105.5 on the TrackMan. So not only was it the first big cool assignment I’ve had in professional baseball and there were 6,000 people there—I’d never worked in front of a crowd that big to that point—but now I have guys throwing just absolute gas. It was a cool experience for sure.

Jason:

Here’s the important question: how were your catchers that night?

Bobby:

To be expected in an All-Star game, you’re going to have some pretty good catchers. I had Joey Bart for the Northwest League for five or six innings and he’s the top catching prospect in the Giants organization. So I definitely had some good guys in front of me and am grateful for that!

Jason:

Does 103 look different coming at you then 95?

Bobby:

Not really. You know, everything 96+ kind of looks the same unless it’s got a little two-seam action that’s tailing on you. But yeah, for the most part it all looks the same. 105 definitely looks different though, I’ll tell you that!

Jason:

Okay, okay, there’s your threshold: 103 manageable, 105 watch out!

Bobby:

Yep.

Jason:

Oh my gosh, I can only imagine. So Bobby, when I first met you a few weeks ago, you were just about to help teach a clinic down in Palm Springs. I’ve heard from others who participated in the clinic that that was fabulous and fantastic. And I was just wondering, what are some of the key messages that you share with younger umpires when you are a part of a clinic like that?

Bobby:

I really like to always start with remaining humble. Don’t get too far ahead of yourself. If somebody is taking their time to help you get better at this, there might be a chance that you can take something away from it. The biggest struggle with newer officials is just the situation management handling, interacting with coaches or the players. Listen to comprehend over replying—because sometimes if we listen to comprehend we can maybe decipher more instead of just hearing, yelling and then yelling back. So those are a few of the big points I always try to touch on with younger officials.

Jason:

Do you see patterns with younger umpires mechanically that you see over and over again that are correctable in a clinic situation like that?

Bobby:

Yeah, definitely. And a lot of it comes down to timing. We get so excited when we’re younger and newer at this; you feel so amped up. A lot of times that’s the biggest thing I notice. Timing can be the biggest factor in anything in umpiring; it’s one of the hardest things, I believe, to master your timing in anything that you do out on the field. So over time that’ll come. But initially it just feels that that’s a noticeable trend and everything tends to be really quick.

Jason:

Well, Bobby, this is The Umpire Inspire Podcast, as you well know. So around here we think that we’re doing more in this job than just calling balls and strikes. And I know you to be someone who believes that too. And one of the reasons, one of the ways that you live that is by participating with the Umps Care charity. Is that right?

Bobby:

Yeah, definitely.

Jason:

Can you give me the lowdown on what Umps Care is all about, how you’ve participated in the past, and what kinds of things that you might be interested contributing in the future?

Bobby: 

Yeah, Umps Care is a charity organization that was started by a few major league umpires. They help less fortunate youth and families across the country, whether it be financially, or a scholarship, or just simply having them to the ballpark and showing them around a little bit before the game. I’ve participated in a couple of ways and you could too on Umps Care, come make a donation to the charity. It’s completely nonprofit, everything’s going towards a great thing. I like to donate towards somebody playing in a golf tournament where all the proceeds go towards a specific charity group or helping an individual. This year will be my second year participating in an Umps Care bowling event in Tempe, Arizona. We raise money amongst all of us minor league umpires, which typically amounts somewhere north of $10,000. The event overall is a really, really cool thing. And of course you get out and get a little competitive amongst the crews, and the winner gets a nice round of golf somewhere in Phoenix. It’s an exciting event, you get a little competitive, but overall the nature of the event is bigger than what we’re just doing by simply bowling and raising money. It’s helping people that really need it. And that’s ultimately the mantra over there: “helping people is an easy call.” So I definitely stand for that charity event and have really, really enjoyed being a part of anything that Umps Care does.

Jason:

“Helping is an easy call.” That’s awesome. What was the website where people can find out about Umps Care?

Bobby:

www.umpscare.com.

Jason:

Okay. I think we can remember that.

So to wrap things up—or to head in that direction—Bobby, do you have any thoughts to share with the younger or newer umpires that are listening to the podcast today? It wasn’t so long ago that you were a younger or newer umpire yourself. You’ve made a, maybe it doesn’t always feel like a quick trip up the ladder, but you’re making your way and I’m sure you can remember the days where you were just thinking about it and maybe considering taking that next step or hearing those guys saying, “man, I wish I would have” and pondering, “man, maybe I should.” What would you say to those guys that are in that spot, and what kinds of things would you say to encourage them to keep on going to pursue this craft, this passion a little more directly?

Bobby:

Yeah, I would definitely say ultimately keep having fun with it. If you’re not having fun, then maybe you need to do some evaluating. Be willing to learn. Don’t give up over a bad game. Help each other out and be willing to learn. Ultimately, you know, I still learn even at the level I’m at. I never think that I’m above any game that I work. Whether it be a couple of nine-year-old games that I worked Monday night out here in Phoenix with my partner from the Midwest League, or what have you, just remaining humble that, okay, I’m working Little League today. “I don’t think this is the level of ball I should be working.” No. Approach it differently.

I think I mentioned this to you when we worked together in Palm Springs—I like those common games because things are unordinary in them, and as an umpire it’s exciting because now we get to umpire something that’s simply more than routine like a safe play at first or a ball right down the middle. So those types of things, that approach, that would be something I would tell somebody that’s new at this. Always think of games as an opportunity to either work on your skills, work on something—regardless of the level that you’re working at.

Jason:

Well said. That’s awesome.

Well, Bobby, I want to wrap this up by thanking you for a couple of things. First of all, it’s been brought up a couple of times that you and I met a couple of weeks ago down in Palm Springs. We were doing an MSBL adult baseball tournament. This was right before the clinic you taught down there. And I went down there to see what umpiring one of those tournaments was all about because I’ve been down as a player with my men’s team several times, but had never umpired one of those tournaments. And I had a lot of fun. I met some great guys. And for a Northwesterner like me, the opportunity for three days in the sunshine was not to be understated. That was a big part of it. But I was fortunate that on that Sunday morning I was paired up with you for a doubleheader, and I just want to thank you because I was not expecting what I got. The opportunity to meet you, to just talk about your journey… and then Bobby, you basically just gave me a private five-hour clinic on that field that day. Every half-inning we’d meet in between there, talk about things that happened in the previous half-inning, just chat about this or that. You answered a lot of my questions and I really appreciated that. That was definitely the highlight of my weekend. I can remember a couple specific things that we talked about that happened in the game that I’ve now passed on to some of my guys here. If you remember, we had the transfer play on the second batter of the game and we discussed some strategies to help a base umpire decide, “okay, was that not voluntarily release or was that an actual transfer, and we’re going to hang onto that out?” And so I’ve passed on your advice to my umpires here to watch the direction of the ball. I don’t know if you remember telling me about that, that was a really good one. We talked about infield fly positioning and decision making. We talked about fighting for position on a couple plays there when I was over in A… and anyways, man, I just wanted to thank you for that, straight up, because that was a really cool opportunity for me. You were very generous with your comments and all your input and I didn’t expect to have an opportunity like that going down there. But that was surely the highlight of my weekend.

Bobby:

Absolutely. Mine too. And I always love helping guys that are willing. Like I said, I don’t have everything figured out, but if I have somebody that’s willing to even be a little receptive to feedback, I love doing that, especially with my education background.

Jason:

Yeah, there you go. So the second thing I want to thank you for, Bobby, is for coming on the show. This has been awesome, and I wish you all the best of luck this year. It’s been great making your acquaintance and your friendship and now I’ve got somebody else to keep tabs on and to watch over the course of the season. I hope that you and I can keep in touch and maybe we’ll do a podcast chapter two down the road and see how things are going for you. And I definitely hope to run into you on a ball field again sometime soon.

Bobby:

Absolutely. Maybe down in Palm Springs again.

Jason:

All right pal. Hey, good luck at Spring Training. Don’t let anybody out-hustle you! And thanks again for coming onto the show.

Bobby:

Thank you Jason. Appreciate it.

Jason:

That was a ton of fun for me. What a pleasure to visit with the guy in Bobby’s unique position. I admire so much that Bobby is just a real humble guy and is so quick to acknowledge and thank the veterans and the mentors who have helped him along the way. And as mentioned in the show: now you and I, dear listeners, have someone to follow in the box scores this year and cheer on as he works the Carolina League and on his way up toward MLB. I have no doubt that Bobby is going to go far!

Thank you for checking out The Umpire Inspire Podcast! Please let me know what you like about the show and how it can be improved (you can email your thoughts to me here). I’d be very happy to hear from you.

And if you enjoyed this conversation, please share it with your umpire friends who you think might enjoy listening!

 

 

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